Andrew Arida, Director of Undergraduate Admissions at UBC, talks about a few of the benefits of the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme.

Diploma Subjects at GNS

This exciting curriculum is available to students in Grades 11 and 12 in the Senior School. The IB Diploma represents a complete philosophy of pre-university education. The structure is designed to meet certain needs, which are highly advantageous now, in university and in life. These needs may be simplified as:

  • Breadth: students are exposed to a balanced program including elements of each of the major intellectual fields.
  • Depth: students pursue certain elements of study to a comparatively advanced level.
  • Independence: students are able to work independently in developing an area of study to an advanced level.
  • Critical thought: students develop the intellectual rigour and philosophical background necessary to evaluate and use the knowledge acquired.
  • Creativity, Activity And Service: students find balance in their school life by being involved in creative pursuits, activities that contribute to their physical well-being, and service opportunities.

At GNS, the following courses may be offered for each subject group.

Group 1: Studies in language and literature

IB Literature A (HL) 11

Either this course or IB Language and Literature A 11 is required

For students who enjoy and are adept at English, this course allows students to have the opportunity to study World Literature in depth, and to develop oral and extended essay writing skills. The focus is to apply students’ MYP training in developing connections, and to narrow this to a scholarly focus on language. The course emphasizes a focus on the exploration of language use across global texts and literary genres. Summer reading of student-choice novels is required. Written work focuses upon the World Literature in Translation essay, an extended written piece honed over several drafts. Students also deliver oral commentaries and presentations based on their independent exploration of literature. The challenges of the tasks lay the foundation for success at an advanced level in university.

IB Literature A (HL or SL) 12

Either this course or English 12 is required
Prerequisite: IB Literature A 11

Standard Level: This course includes detailed study of fiction, poetry and theatre. Students explore some of the greatest authors in contemporary and historical writing, the use of rhetoric in poetry and prose, and drama in part through The Bard on the Beach interdisciplinary unit. The course provides analysis methodologies and expression skills that are invaluable for future studies in the humanities and the social sciences. This is the advised course for DP students who would like to reduce their workload in English at Grade 12 as it is designed to provide a less intensive pace than the HL course, with fewer texts to cover, and with some of the assessments graded on easier rubrics. The most visible difference is in the weekly reduction in homework and intensity compared to the HL course.

Higher Level: This course includes detailed study of fiction, poetry and theatre. Universal literary themes such as alienation and isolation, the role of the artist and the arts in society, and the nature of human spirituality are explored and discussed. Students develop a deeper awareness of the art and craft of writing by exploring how writers use language and form to create meaning. They will further develop academic reading, writing, and speaking skills as they complete various projects, which include essays, creative presentations and formal oral presentations. Students who did not write the English 12 Provincial Exam in Grade 11 will write the exam in January, April or June, according to readiness. Major benefits of this course for the qualified student will be preparation for success at an advanced level in university.

IB Language & Literature A (HL) 11

Either this course or IB Literature A 11 is required

This two-year, four-part course focuses on the study of English language and literature across cultures. Parts 1 and 2 aim to help students broaden their perspectives and develop skills in both the analysis and production of a range of text types, including fiction, non-fiction and mass media. Students investigate how language develops in different cultural contexts and how it helps to shape identity. They also consider how language is used in the media and how its production and reception is affected by the medium itself. Parts 3 and 4 provide detailed study of literature. Here, students consider the changing contexts (social, cultural and historical) in which texts are written and received, while also demonstrating how form, structure and style can influence meaning. In short, the course is geared toward those students looking for a good blend of creative writing, new media explorations and focused literary studies.

This course leads to IB Language and Literature A (HL or SL) 12 and concludes with an in-school final examination.

IB School Supported Language A Self-taught (SL) 11

This demanding literature course provides an opportunity for students to continue to develop oral and written skills in their mother tongue while studying in a different language of instruction. Students wishing to embark upon this course of study should be prepared to work independently, manage their time effectively, and meet regularly with the Diploma Coordinator. Diploma candidates who successfully complete English Literature A (HL or SL) and a Self-taught Language (SL) will obtain a bilingual diploma. Examples of Self- taught subjects that GNS has supported in the past include: Chinese, French, German, Korean and Urdu.

Interested students must meet with the IB Diploma Coordinator.

IB School Supported Language A Self-taught (SL) 12

This constitutes the final year of the two-year IB School Supported Language A course. This demanding literature course provides an opportunity for students to continue to develop oral and written skills in their mother tongue while studying in a different language of instruction. Diploma candidates who successfully complete English Literature A (HL or SL) and a Self-taught Language (SL) will obtain a bilingual diploma. Examples of Self- taught subjects that GNS has supported in the past include: Chinese, French, German, Korean and Urdu.

Group 2: Language acquisition

IB French B (HL or SL) 11

Prerequisite: IB French 10 or IB French 10 (Enhanced); not for native speakers

This course is the first year of the two-year IB Diploma French B course and is suitable for those who have had enhanced French or who wish to continue with either Standard Level or Higher Level in Grade 12.

Standard Level: Students expand on their vocabulary, grammatical structures and idiomatic expressions in order to increase their communication skills and global understanding of the language. They should be able to link statements in past, present and future tenses while completing authentic tasks, and will learn to write in a variety of styles and text types.

Higher Level: Students are expected to interact in French at all times during classes and work independently outside of the classroom to continue research and review. Work is not only evaluated from a linguistic perspective, but also with regard to content and the ability to respond to a wide variety of tasks, largely based on higher-order learning.

IB French B (HL or SL) 12

Prerequisite: IB French B (HL or SL) 11; not for native speakers

Higher Level: Two literary texts are studied in preparation for the IB HL external assessment. A more demanding level of oral communication, comprehension and writing are required to develop fluency and prepare for exams and later endeavours in this field. Students are expected to interact in French at all times during classes, and to research, read and review independently outside the classroom to increase their knowledge and maintain grammar skills. Students choose between Standard Level and Higher Level French during the Fall Term.

Standard Level: Students continue to develop fluency as they prepare for exams and later endeavours in this field. Oral communication, comprehension and writing are centered on various topics and themes. Students are expected to interact in French at all times during classes, and to research, read and review independently outside the classroom to increase their knowledge and understanding in the language, and maintain their grammar skills.

IB Chinese B (HL or SL) 11

Prerequisite: Mandarin 10; not for native speakers

Students are introduced to some literary texts. The primary focus is on language acquisition and the development of skills at a sophisticated level. Students are expected to interact in Mandarin at all times during classes, and work independently outside of the classroom to increase their knowledge and understanding of the language. Students’ work is not only evaluated from a linguistic perspective, but also with regard to content and the ability to respond to a wide variety of tasks, largely based on higher order learning.

IB Chinese B (HL or SL) 12

Prerequisite: IB Mandarin B (HL or SL) 11; not for native speakers

This constitutes the final year of the two-year IB Diploma Language B course, which leads to the IB exam at either Standard or Higher level. A more demanding level of work than in previous years is required of students in order to develop fluency, and prepare them adequately for exams and later endeavours in this field. Oral communication, comprehension and writing are centered on various topics and themes. Students are expected to interact in Mandarin at all times during classes, and to research, read and review independently outside the classroom to increase their knowledge and understanding in the language.

IB Spanish ab initio (SL) 11

Prerequisite: None; not for native speakers

The IB Spanish ab initio course is for students with little or no experience of the language. It is organized into themes using topics that provide students with opportunities to practise and explore the language and to develop intercultural understanding. Through the development of receptive, productive and interactive skills, students become confident in their ability to respond and interact appropriately in a range of everyday situations.

This course is suitable for:

  1. New Grade 11 students who might not otherwise meet the school’s graduation requirements for a second language
  2. Any student who enrols in the Senior School without a second language and who would like to complete the Diploma Programme
  3. Current students who would like to study a new second language as part of the Diploma Programme (i.e., Change from French or Mandarin to Spanish ab initio)

IB Spanish B ab initio (SL) 12

Prerequisite: IB Spanish B 11 ab initio; not for native speakers

A more demanding level of work is required of students in order to develop fluency, and prepare them adequately for exams and later endeavours in this field. Oral communication, comprehension and writing are centered on various topics and themes. Students are expected to interact in Spanish during classes, and to research, read and review independently to increase their knowledge and understanding in the language.

IB Spanish B (HL or SL) 11

Prerequisite: Spanish 10; not for native speakers

The course includes an introduction to some literary works. The primary focus is on language acquisition and the development of skills at a sophisticated level. Students are expected to interact in Spanish at all times during class and work independently outside of the classroom to increase their knowledge and understanding in the language. Students’ work is not only evaluated from a linguistic perspective, but also with regard to content and the ability to respond to a wide-variety of tasks, largely based on higher order learning.

IB Spanish B (HL or SL) 12

Prerequisite: IB Spanish B (HL or SL) 11 or the permission of the Department Head; not for native speakers

A more demanding level of work is required of students in order to develop fluency, and prepare them adequately for exams and later endeavours in this field. Oral communication, comprehension and writing are centered on various topics and themes. Students are expected to interact in Spanish at all times during class, and to research, read and review independently to increase their knowledge and understanding in the language.

Group 3: Individuals and societies

IB History 11 (HL)

Scandal, protest, betrayal, assassination & mayhem: who said history is boring?

Looking through the lens of history helps us make sense of today’s world and the complex issues that challenge and interest us. Students in IB History routinely examine the historical context of current political, economic and social issues. The study of war, revolution, dictatorships, democracies and human rights within the Americas encompass the broad themes of our curriculum. Students engage in seminar discussion, collaborative work, serious research and analysis. A historical investigation of 2200 words on a topic chosen by the student serves as the IB History internal assessment.

IB History (HL or SL) 12

Prerequisite: IB History (HL) 11

Year two of the IB History course of study focuses on the history of the 20th century with specific emphasis on the following IB topics: a document-based case study approach on the theme of rights and protest in South Africa’s Apartheid era and the civil rights movement in the United States, the Rise of Authoritarian Leaders and Single Party States (through a selected study of three or four of the following: Lenin, Stalin, Hitler, Mao and Castro); and the Cold War (with an emphasis on its origins, events and outcomes). The evaluation and analysis of primary sources is an important skill acquired at this level, as is the ongoing development of sophisticated research and writing skills. Seminar discussion, document studies, essay work and historiography represent some points of emphasis. Students in IB History 12 submit a final draft of their Internal Assessment.

IB Geography 11 (HL)

Diseases, Disasters & Disparity: more than just maps!

Are you ready to investigate real world issues that speak to our relationship with our planet and its people? IB Geography 11 offers a front-row seat from which to engage in the important study of population, climate, resources and global security. The United Nation Sustainable Development Goals 2030 serve as a guiding piece in this course. Additionally, specific topics include: globalization, global disparity, and the geography of food and health. HL students have the opportunity to investigate global interactions focusing on power, diversity and risk. Topics are studied using a variety of methods such as: research assignments, case studies, formal lectures, group work and presentations. Students develop research skills and complete an internal assessment—a 2500-word field study based on their own fieldwork—centered on course curriculum.

IB Geography (HL or SL) 12

Prerequisite: IB Geography (HL) 11

This is the second year of IB Geography. While the course continues to build on themes from the first year of IB Geography, the themes include oceans and their coastal margins, hazards and disasters and global interactions. Oceans and their coastal margins are studied as an introduction to the physical characteristics and processes of the oceans and those that influence climatic conditions, issues arising from the oceans as resource bases, and an emphasis on coastal margins management. Hazards and disasters: risk assessment and response examines the environmental hazards that exist at the interface between physical geography and human geography, as many natural hazard events are often affected by natural environmental conditions and exacerbated by human actions. Higher level students focus on the global interactions, flows and exchanges arising from the disparities that exist between places. Throughout the year, these topics are taught using a variety of methods including individual research assignments, case studies, formal lecture, group work and presentations. Students submit a final draft of their Internal Assessment.

IB Economics (SL) 11

Markets, Money & Models: economists, manipulating human behaviour since Adam Smith.

Economics is a dynamic social science, and is essentially about dealing with scarcity, resource allocation and the methods and processes by which choices are made in the satisfaction of human wants. Economics uses scientific methodologies that include quantitative and qualitative elements. This is an ideal course for students wishing to pursue business or entrepreneurial routes.

This course emphasizes the economic theories of microeconomics, which deal with economic variables affecting individuals, firms and markets, and the economic theories of macroeconomics, which deal with economic variables affecting countries, governments and societies. These economic theories are not to be studied in a vacuum—rather, they are to be applied to real-world issues. Prominent among these issues are fluctuations in economic activity, international trade, economic development and environmental sustainability. Over the course of two years, students complete an internal assessment consisting of three 750-word economics commentaries illustrating their knowledge of economic theory and terms, using contemporary news articles.

IB Economics (SL) 12

Prerequisite: IB Economics (SL) 11

The second year of IB Economics builds upon the theories of micro and macro economics that are learned in year one of the course. The focus of year two is on international economics and development economics. A sample of specific topics includes international exchange rates, balance of payments, measuring economic development, the role of international debt, and the balance between markets and intervention. The evaluation and analysis of primary sources is an important skill developed in this course, as is the ongoing development of evaluative writing skills. Seminar discussion, document studies, essay work and article review are some of the instructional strategies used. Students complete their internal assessment commentaries started in year one of this course.

IB Global Politics 11 (HL)

Security, Power & Politics: “peace is not merely the absence of visible conflict.” ~ Barack Obama

IB Global Politics explores fundamental political concepts, such as power, liberty, equality, sustainability, human rights and peace, in a range of contexts and through a variety of approaches. Students examine local, national and international arenas of political activity. The course allows students to develop research, analysis and critical evaluation skills as they study abstract concepts and apply them to real world examples and cases studies. In addition, HL students examine two global political challenges. Students complete an internal assessment activity where a political issue is explored through theory and combined with a experiential learning piece and a written report.

Group 4: Sciences

IB Chemistry (HL) 11

Prerequisite: C+ standing in Foundations of Mathematics and Pre-Calculus 10 is recommended

This course integrates topics from the IB Chemistry and BC curriculum. It explores the nature of matter, including chemical reactions, the mole concept, electron configuration, organic chemistry and periodicity. A study of chemical bonding leads naturally to the understanding of Lewis structures, and solution chemistry. Both the qualitative and quantitative aspects of these topics are developed. Hands-on experience in the lab offers students the opportunity to grow in confidence as experiments become more intricate and skills progress. All students in this course participate in the Group IV Project with students in Biology and Physics, where cooperative scientific investigations are performed. Students are occasionally taken on local field trips.

IB Chemistry (HL or SL) 12

Prerequisite: IB Chemistry 11 and Pre-Calculus 11 (C+ recommended); IB Mathematics (SL) 11 (Pre-Calculus 12) is a co- requisite

IB Chemistry 12 covers all of the material necessary to prepare students as candidates for the IB Chemistry Higher or Standard Level Examination. Students are expected to demonstrate a high level of independent study and an ability to observe events and process data leading to original experimentation. Students are expected to keep a portfolio of all practical work covered in the two years. Students are occasionally taken on local field trips.

IB Physics (HL) 11

Prerequisite: C+ standing in Foundations of Mathematics and Pre-Calculus 10 is recommended

Students earn a credit for IB Physics (HL) 11 when they complete this introductory course. The course integrates topics from the IB Physics and BC curriculum. It includes some of the major topics of physics such as mechanics in two dimensions, wave motion, and optics. Problems are related to practical applications and extend the knowledge of topics taught in Sciences 8, 9 and 10. Problem solving reinforces the relationship of mathematics and science and hones mathematical skills. A wide variety of laboratory investigations enhance understanding of the subject matter and the nature of the scientific method. All students in this course participate in the Group IV Project with students in Biology and Chemistry, where cooperative scientific investigations are performed. Students are occasionally taken on local field trips.

IB Physics (HL or SL) 12

Prerequisite: IB Physics 11 and Pre-Calculus 11 (C+ recommended in each)

Standard Level: This course sets out to give a rigorous grounding in the fundamentals of Physics, and is aimed primarily at students who may not be considering pursuing a science or engineering program at university, but enjoy science and mathematics. Topics covered include electrostatics, electric circuits, electromagnetism, global warming and atomic and nuclear physics. Activities include laboratory investigations and a significant problem-solving component. Students are expected to complete an independent investigation as a lab requirement for the course.

Higher Level: IB Physics (HL) 12 is a rigorous course and covers all the topics studied in IB Physics (SL) 12 with additional topics including quantum physics, thermodynamics and digital communications, as well as optional topics. IB Physics (HL) 12 offers the best preparation for a science or engineering program at any university. Students are expected to demonstrate a high level of independent study and an ability to manipulate and analyze data. Students who like mathematics and science and wish to challenge themselves will enjoy IB Physics (HL) 12. Students are expected to complete an independent investigation as a lab requirement for this course.

IB Biology (HL) 11

Students earn a credit for IB Biology (HL) 11 when they complete this introductory course. The course integrates topics from the IB Biology and BC curriculum. It explores numerous aspects of living systems and provides students with an opportunity to develop a deeper appreciation of the natural world and the interrelationships among all living things. Within this context, emphasis is placed on developing an increased understanding of the scientific method, ecology, genetics, levels of organization, evolution and adaptation, classification and taxonomy, microbiology, and plant biology. All students in this course participate in the Group IV Project with students in Chemistry and Physics, where cooperative scientific investigations are performed. Students are occasionally taken on field trips in order to utilize the abundant teaching resources in our region.

IB Biology (HL or SL) 12

Prerequisite: IB Biology 11

This course focuses on providing students with an understanding of cell biology, introductory biochemistry, and mammalian physiology. Toward this goal, students first build a solid foundation of knowledge on the structural and functional organization of the eukaryotic cell. With this knowledge in place, students can comfortably move on to study the three essential life processes of cells and tissues: nutrient absorption and synthesis, respiration, and excretion. After gaining an understanding of the individual cell and how it works, students then move on to study how cells interact and function as tissues to regulate the internal environment of an entire organism. This course is ideally suited for students wishing to pursue a career in the medical or biological sciences, or anyone interested in making well-informed choices about personal health and lifestyle. Students are occasionally taken on field trips in order to utilize the abundant teaching resources in our region.

Group 5: Mathematics

IB Mathematical Studies (SL) 11 (Pre-Calculus 11)

Prerequisite: Foundations of Mathematics and Pre-Calculus 10

This is a comprehensive course that builds on the algebra learned in previous mathematics courses and moves into some more advanced topics including quadratic functions and equations, trigonometry of non-right angles and circular trigonometry, inequalities, rational expressions and equations, inverse functions, and systems of quadratic equations. Problem solving skills are emphasized throughout the course. As this course is recognized to develop abstract skills not only in mathematics but also in reasoning and in applying ideas, it is a requirement for university entrance in most programs. It also satisfies the requirements of Pre-Calculus 11, so students will receive credit for both IB Mathematical Studies (SL) 11 and Pre-Calculus 11.

IB Mathematical Studies (SL) 12

Prerequisite: IB Mathematical Studies (SL) 11 (Pre-Calculus 11)

IB Mathematical Studies (SL) 12 constitutes the second half of the two-year IB Mathematical Studies Curriculum. Pre-Calculus 11 satisfies the first half. IB Mathematical Studies 12 is designed to provide the skills needed to cope with mathematics in real-life situations. The topics covered include a continuation of the work on functions begun in Pre-Calculus 11, sets and logic, financial math, statistics and probability. This course is very useful for a student planning further studies in the humanities. A substantial piece of research—in the form of a project (Internal Assessment—is required and will constitute 20% of the final mark.

IB Mathematics (SL) 11 (Pre-Calculus 12)

Prerequisite: A grade of 73% in IB Mathematical Studies (SL) 11 (Pre-Calculus 11) or permission of the Department Head

This curriculum brings together many concepts and techniques taught throughout high school. Upon successful completion, the student has a well-rounded background in trigonometry, problem solving, functions (logarithmic, exponential, polynomial, radical and rational), and combinatorics. A level of maturity is important for students in this course, as they are required to synthesize their previous mathematical knowledge with new skills, while building their application techniques.

Before entering this course, students must demonstrate their preparedness by achieving a minimum grade of B in Pre-Calculus 11, including a mark of at least 73% on their Pre-Calculus 11 final exam. Students unable to meet this standard are asked to repeat Pre-Calculus 11 over the summer or in the following school year.

IB Mathematics (HL) 11 (Pre-Calculus 12 included)

Prerequisite: permission of the Mathematics Department

IB Mathematics (HL) 11 is intended for students who are strong in and enjoy mathematics. Based on the decision of the school, students of proven ability who display exceptional work habits and reasoning skills, a broad foundation of mathematical knowledge, a keen interest in learning mathematics, and a history of high achievement are permitted to apply to this two-year program. Year one covers the Pre-Calculus 12 Provincial curriculum and several components of the IB Mathematics Higher Level program (complex numbers, trigonometry, and proof and vector geometry). The remaining IB topics are completed during year two. Given both the depth and volume of the material covered in this course, students should expect a faster pace of learning and a greater amount of out of class work.

IB Mathematics (SL) 12

Prerequisite: IB Mathematics (SL) 11 (Pre-Calculus 12) or IB Mathematics (HL) 11 (Pre-Calculus 12 included)

The IB Mathematics program is designed to provide a sound basis for those students planning to pursue further studies that require university level mathematics such as engineering, chemistry, economics, geography and business administration. This is a demanding program as it contains a variety of mathematical topics including differential and integral calculus, vectors, and probability and statistics, which in turn require considerable background knowledge in mathematics. There is also an internal assessment component to this course, which gives students an opportunity to investigate mathematical patterns and processes.

IB Mathematics (HL) 12

Prerequisite: IB Mathematics (HL) 11 (Pre-Calculus 12 included)

Students study further calculus and probability and statistics, while also applying deductive reasoning to prove mathematical results. This course prepares students for many mathematics-based post-secondary programs such as engineering. It also provides them the breadth of mathematical understanding needed to succeed in programs such as business, economics and general science. There is an opportunity to investigate a mathematical concept more deeply as part of the internal assessment component of the IB program.

Group 6: The arts

IB Visual Arts (HL) 11

This course is best suited to those students with an attitude of inquiry, self-motivation and a mature commitment to the study of the visual arts. All students are expected to explore and develop areas of personal interest as they investigate the broader context of the visual arts both historically and culturally. Self-reflection in the form of class discussions, regular critiques, workbook assignments, and documentation of their own unique artistic process, is an integral aspect of this course. The regular use of the process journal as a vehicle for developing a personal repertoire of significant imagery is the foundation for much of the studio work and represents approximately 40% of the term mark.

IB Visual Arts (HL or SL) 12

Prerequisite: IB Visual Arts (HL) 11

Students continue to build on the body of work they began in the previous year; further clarifying their expressive intent, deepening the content of their work and developing their skill level. In the spring, students are required to showcase their journey and development as artists by curating their Studio Work as an exhibition which will be internally assessed (40%). Regular use of their process journal continues to be the basis of studio projects as well as serving to document the development of their ideas. This process of investigation, experimentation and development will be assessed externally (40%) in the form of a Process Portfolio and submitted electronically. Students are also required to submit a Comparative Study (20%) at the end of the program for external assessment.

IB Theatre (HL or SL) 11

The IB Theatre Arts syllabus consists of three equal, interrelated areas: theatre in context, theatre process, and presenting theatre. These areas are approached from the perspective of the following specialist theatre roles: creator, designer, director and performer. Four key tasks make up the IB Theatre course content and assessment. 1) The Solo Theatre Piece (HL): students investigate a theatre theorist and create a solo performance pieces using the techniques and styles they have encountered. 2) The Director’s Notebook (SL and HL): students take on the role of director, responding to and staging a scene from a play of their choosing. 3) Research presentation (SL and HL): students outline and physically demonstrate their research into a convention of a theatre tradition they have not previously studied. 4) Collaborative project (SL and HL): students collaboratively create and present an original piece of theatre for and to a specified target audience, created from a starting point of their choice. This course is open to anyone and no previous experience or coursework is required. This course is of particular interest to those pursuing a career in education or the performing arts. If a student is passionate about theatre, however, this course can become a lens through which they can explore a number of different subject areas.

IB Theatre (HL or SL) 12

Prerequisite: IB Theatre (HL or SL) 11

The IB Theatre Arts syllabus consists of three equal, interrelated areas: theatre in context, theatre process, and presenting theatre. These areas are approached from the perspective of the following specialist theatre roles: creator, designer, director and performer. This course will be of particular interest to those pursuing a career in education or the performing arts. If a student is passionate about theatre, however, this course can become a lens through which they can explore a number of different subject areas.

Standard Level: Three key tasks make up the course content and assessment. 1) The Director’s Notebook: students take on the role of director, responding to and staging a scene from a play of their choosing. 2) Research presentation: students outline and physically demonstrate their research into a convention of a theatre tradition they have not previously studied. 3) Collaborative project: students collaboratively create and present an original piece of theatre for and to a specified target audience, created from a starting point of their choice.

Higher Level: In addition to the three key tasks that make up the course content and assessment for the Standard Level, HL students also complete the additional Solo Theatre Piece: students investigate a theatre theorist and create a solo performance piece using the techniques and styles they have encountered.

PW Program of Studies
Download our Pemberton Woods Program of Studies 2018/2019 for a detailed set of course descriptions.